Umbria Holidays

At nine o'clock in the morning, you amble past Etruscan city walls into the main piazza, originally built as a Roman marketplace. Five men sit in front of a medieval fountain, alternating between arguing politics and laughing. They smile and nod as you walk into your favorite cafe for the best espresso you've ever had. After a few hours strolling ... Read more
through museums and shops and admiring the view of the groves of olive trees below your adopted hill town (where you're sure you will eventually retire), you stop by your favorite Norcineria for some locally made salami. Next door at the alimentari, the owner Carlo suggests a typical Umbrian pecorino (made by his third cousin) and a bottle of Grechetto (from his great-uncle's winery). You drive east, to a wildflower-filled field and ancient abbey suggested by your agriturismo (farm house) hosts. After your two-hour picnic, you continue on -- to the world-famous art and music Spoleto Festival, to contemplate art and spirit in the churches and crypt of the Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi, to hang-glide over medieval hamlets in the wolf- and fairy-populated mystical Monti Sibillini, or to learn to throw pottery at a family-owned majolica ceramics shop in Deruta. In the evening, you eat in a country trattoria -- truffles, umbricelli pasta, wild boar stew, delicate Castelluccian lentils. You retire early, as you have a white-water rafting trip, cooking class and undoubtedly another two- to three-hour meal ahead of you the next day.

Umbria Hotels

Things to see and do in Umbria

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Umbria

Weather

Umbria, known as the green heart of Italy, is perfect to visit in May, June, September and October. In July and August the temperature can reach 90F (30C) and the agriturismos are also the most crowded with a ... Read more
mix of Italians and mostly German tourists. Visit in the shoulder season, however, and enjoy the cured meats of Norcia, medieval hill towns, and scenic drives relatively undisturbed. November - April brings cold and rain, but can still be a good time to hole up in a vacation rental, light the fires and sample hearty Umbrian cooking.

Top Umbria restaurants

Umbria

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Umbria reviews

  • 9.8
    Foodies
  • 9.2
    Outdoor Enthusiasts
  • 7.8
    History Buffs
  • 7.8
    Luxury Travellers
  • 7.1
    Art & Design Lovers

Member Reviews(32)

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London

Umbria is sometimes, well, okay, almost always, overlooked on the Rome-Venice-Florence Italy junket. This central region has the rolling hills of Tuscany, with some great wines, and none of the crowds. Medieval towns like Assisi and Spoleto are ridiculously charming, and the food is really amazing, from olive oil, to cured meats (go to Norcia) to zuppa di farro and strozzapreti pasta with wild boar sauce. Just watch out for the unsalted bread.

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Huntington Beach

This beautiful region of Italy is one of my faves! Unlike Tuscany, it is not overrun with tourists. There is a charm to the region, almost an innocence, that isn't found in more commercial parts of the country. Assisi, Spoleto, Orvieto, and Todi are stunning! I can't wait to go back and experience more of the magical hills.

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Melbourne

Umbria is one of Italy's smallest regions (Italian word Ombra means shadow, thus Umbria is but a shadow of the rest of the regions) but it is chock full of interesting, charming, and historical cities. Perugia is it's capital and a great start for visiting the region.

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Local from Perugia

What I can say about Umbria, I was born here, is my region...
Umbria has very small and beautiful cities, for me Assisi is the most beautiful of these, It's a back to the past, on middleages , when You enter in the old town, you shoud meet a Knight templar, or St. Francis in person that says to You: "Hey man: forgot Your work, Your life and your world, and follow me to serve the poors"...

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Montrose

live here for 8 - 9 months. went on holiday in the june "95". came home and decided that i wanted to live there. so move there in december "95"

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Sure, Rome Venice Florence are a must (forget Milan) But I suggest Umbria. it is a region in central italy, next to Tuscany but more authentic and less touristc. Perugia is the biggest town, a real jewel, but all the other small towns and villages, all on top of hills and retaining theyr medieval origins, are absolutely stunning. Check Assisi out or Spoleto and Todi or the wonderful surroundings of the Lake Trasimeno...typical cuisine is hearty and genuine, art if you are interested is breathtaking and everywhwere. its position is also strategic to visit florence Siena (another favourite) and Rome.

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Comunaglia, Umbria, Italy

Umbria is the perfect holiday destination for Italy lovers - it has everything that you could dream of, hilltop villages, great food, wonderful wines, culture, history, fields of sunflowers, slopes covered with olive groves and vineyards and the inimitable Italian hospitality.

Life here is still very much classical Italian, long siestas between 1pm and 4pm, large family lunches and gatherings, food a main topic of conversation, football a key issue... Things carry on here very much unchanged by time. Sure the younger generation is pushing to get out, move from the countryside to the towns but the core of Umbria, landowners, farm workers, will always be here, the kitchen the heart of the home and family reunions at the centre of things.

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Kiryat Gat

Ahhhh... Umbria.
My favorite of all regions of Italy. If its breathtaking beauty is not enough, the wine and food will do the rest.

An afternoon travel to one of many countryside villages (Spello, Spoleto, Gubio, Todi) and maybe a visit to one of the bigger cities (Orvieto, Perugia) will show the true nature of the people there.
Tranquility and silence collide with the green slopes and trees, it is truly a magical place to be.

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Local from Perugia

Have been living in Umbria since 2001 and still love every aspect of this region. The people, the nature, the lovely old hill towns, the food and wine ... did I forget anything? The excellent olive oil and the weather! If possible I would visit outside high season (high season being July and August).
Feel free to ask me any questions you have about visiting Umbria and in case you are looking for a holiday rental here ... I have many I can recommend!

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Local from Assisi

Umbria offers a smorgasbord spread of what travellers to Italy are looking for in one handy bite-sized package: hilltowns and undulating landscapes, food and wine, history and culture, food and wine, music and art festivals, food and wine, museums and monuments, and--oh!--did I mention food and wine? What Umbria is lacking: the tourist crush of neighboring Tuscany.

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