All photos (8)Golden Gate (Zlatna Vrata)
Golden Gate (Zlatna Vrata)
Golden Gate (Zlatna Vrata)

Golden Gate (Zlatna Vrata)

9.721 reviews
Sights and Museums, Landmark
Ranked #7 in Split things to do
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Dioklecijanova ul. 10, 21000, Split, Croatia
+385 21 361 524
https://www.facebook.com/centar.zlatna.vrata/
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Description
Golden Gate (Zlatna Vrata) is a gate to the main entry of Diocletian's Palace.

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Ottawa

Porta septemtrionalis is their Roman name. Emperor Diocletian walked through them as he entered the Palace on the 1st of June 305. They were built in the shape of a rectangle, with double doors, as part of the defensive military tactics (propugnaculum). The facade was decorated with niches containing figure sculptures of the four tetrarchs (Diocletian, Maximian, Galerius and Constantius Chlorus). These doors, starting from Peristyle, and then through Cardo street, led directly towards Salona as the capital city of the Roman Province Dalmatia, and could only be used by the emperor and the members of his family. Today they are, together with the nearby monument to the Bishop Gregius of Nin (Grgur Ninski), the work of a great Croatian sculptor Ivan Meštrović, one of the favourite Split tourist spots. Under the influence of Venice, in the 16th century, the gates change their name to Porta Aurea or Golden Gates, and this name stayed with them to this day.

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Ottawa

Porta septemtrionalis is their Roman name. Emperor Diocletian walked through them as he entered the Palace on the 1st of June 305. They were built in the shape of a rectangle, with double doors, as part of the defensive military tactics (propugnaculum).
The facade was decorated with niches containing figure sculptures of the four tetrarchs (Diocletian, Maximian, Galerius and Constantius Chlorus). These doors, starting from Peristyle, and then through Cardo street, led directly towards Salona as the capital city of the Roman Province Dalmatia, and could only be used by the emperor and the members of his family. Today they are, together with the nearby monument to the Bishop Gregius of Nin (Grgur Ninski), the work of a great Croatian sculptor Ivan Meštrović, one of the favourite Split tourist spots.

Under the influence of Venice, in the 16th century, the gates change their name to Porta Aurea or Golden Gates, and this name stayed with them to this day.

Recommended for:History Buffs
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Porta septemtrionalis is their Roman name. Emperor Diocletian walked through them as he entered the Palace on the 1st of June 305. They were built in the shape of a rectangle, with double doors, as part of the defensive military tactics (propugnaculum).

The facade was decorated with niches containing figure sculptures of the four tetrarchs (Diocletian, Maximian, Galerius and Constantius Chlorus). These doors, starting from Peristyle, and then through Cardo street, led directly towards Salona as the capital city of the Roman Province Dalmatia, and could only be used by the emperor and the members of his family. Today they are, together with the nearby monument to the Bishop Gregius of Nin (Grgur Ninski), the work of a great Croatian sculptor Ivan Meštrović, one of the favourite Split tourist spots.

Under the influence of Venice, in the 16th century, the gates change their name to Porta Aurea or Golden Gates, and this name stayed with them to this day.

Recommended for:History Buffs
Helpful
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Porta septemtrionalis is their Roman name. Emperor Diocletian walked through them as he entered the Palace on the 1st of June 305. They were built in the shape of a rectangle, with double doors, as part of the defensive military tactics (propugnaculum).

The facade was decorated with niches containing figure sculptures of the four tetrarchs (Diocletian, Maximian, Galerius and Constantius Chlorus). These doors, starting from Peristyle, and then through Cardo street, led directly towards Salona as the capital city of the Roman Province Dalmatia, and could only be used by the emperor and the members of his family. Today they are, together with the nearby monument to the Bishop Gregius of Nin (Grgur Ninski), the work of a great Croatian sculptor Ivan Meštrović, one of the favourite Split tourist spots.

Under the influence of Venice, in the 16th century, the gates change their name to Porta Aurea or Golden Gates, and this name stayed with them to this day.

Recommended for:History Buffs
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Ottawa

Porta septemtrionalis is their Roman name. Emperor Diocletian walked through them as he entered the Palace on the 1st of June 305. They were built in the shape of a rectangle, with double doors, as part of the defensive military tactics (propugnaculum).

The facade was decorated with niches containing figure sculptures of the four tetrarchs (Diocletian, Maximian, Galerius and Constantius Chlorus). These doors, starting from Peristyle, and then through Cardo street, led directly towards Salona as the capital city of the Roman Province Dalmatia, and could only be used by the emperor and the members of his family. Today they are, together with the nearby monument to the Bishop Gregius of Nin (Grgur Ninski), the work of a great Croatian sculptor Ivan Meštrović, one of the favourite Split tourist spots.

Under the influence of Venice, in the 16th century, the gates change their name to Porta Aurea or Golden Gates, and this name stayed with them to this day.

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London

The Golden Gate used to be the main entrance into Diocletian's Palace and was therefore always the most spectacular out of the palace’s entrances. Either side of the gate are two large towers, which now look over the Gregory of Nin Statue and several souvenir stalls. You'll notice the double door entrance that still stands today, which was designed as a defence mechanism to fend off any potential attackers. From the gate the picturesque Dioklecijanova Street leads you straight to the Peristyle.

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New Delhi

also known as the northern gate, was the main palace entrance in 4th century AD. marked by the massive Grgur Ninksi statue.

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Pleasant Hill
First to Review

This great gate was the main entry of Diocletian's Palace. It's name actually suggests the importance of this gateway to Salona, the Roman provincial capital at the time. Standing inside the gate itself, it was easy for me to appreciate the double-door design that kept the palace safe. Near by and outside the gate is Ivan Mestrovic's statue of Bishop Gregory of Nin.

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Playa de Gandia

Una de las cuatro puertas de acceso al Palacio Dioclesiano, sin dudas la que mejor se conserva y la mas bonita e importante. Desde esta puerta se accede actualmente al centro histórico, antes lo que era el palacio, donde reside gente y hay muchos locales. Es como que dentro de las ruinas del antiguo palacio la gente vive como si nada, por algo se lo llama el palacio vivo. ¡Muy loco pero a su vez todo de una belleza indescriptible! Por algo es Patrimonio de la Unesco, bien merecido lo tiene.

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Madrid

Las puertas de acceso al Palacio Dioclesiano podía hacerse a través de cualquiera de sus 4 puertas: plata, bronce, hierro y esta puerta la dorada.

Saliendo por ella nos encontramos la estatua de Gregorio de Nin, a quien hay que tocarle el dedo del pie para tener suerte!

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Local from Split
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Golden Gate (Zlatna Vrata)

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