Faro Travel Guide

Introduction to Faro

Book flights to Faro for sunbathing, surfing, and swinging your golf clubs in Portugal's picturesque Algarve region.

Often skipped in favour of Albufeira, Vilamoura and Praia da Rocha, the city of Faro is an attractive city perfect for a slow-paced city break in the sun. Although signs of gentrification are creeping in, the city is still maintains a traditional Portuguese atmosphere. Expect townhouses clad in azulejo tiles and lots of down-to-earth cafes where you can linger with the locals over a bica (espresso) and pastel de nata (custard tart).

Ilha Deserta

Ilha Deserta: a sandbar near the Ria Formosa natural park, home to the Algarve's most secluded beaches.

Museu Municipal de Faro

Museu Municipal: Museum set in a 16th Century convent. Exhibits include 3rd century tiles, Islamic artefacts, paintings by Carlos Filipe Porfírio and regular fado performances.

Igreja do Carmo

Igreja do Carmo: Baroque church with a bone chapel: one for the morbid.

Other things to do in Faro

Wandering around the cobblestoned old town is a real treat for history buffs. Medieval churches, whitewashed houses, grand stone archways and intricate azulejo tiles tell the tale of Faro's Roman origins, Muslim occupation and Christian reconquest in the 16th Century.  Praia de Faro, the city's beach, offers an excellent place to soak up the sun. A boat trip on the Ria Formosa Natural Park, one of the 7 Wonders of Portugal, is an absolute must during your stay. For more inspiration, check out our top 9 things to do in Faro.

The Algarve region is bursting with things to do, so we highly recommend booking car hire at Faro Airport. Go surfing in laid-back Lagos, climb to the castle in medieval Silves, or splash around at Aqualand Waterpark. Drive to secluded beaches, play on the region's best golf courses, go wine tasting at Quinta dos Vales, or take the kids for a day out at Krazy World.

Eating and drinking in Faro

From fresh fish to piri-piri spiced chicken, the south of Portugal is famous for its barbecued cuisine. Cataplana, a rich stew of fish or meat served in a characteristic pot, is a must-try regional speciality. The restaurant Dois Irmaos is renowned for their version. In Faro you'll find plenty to tempt your tastebuds, from high-end restaurants in the old town to laid-back seafood cafes on the riverfront. There are some hipster friendly burger bars and vegetarian bistros too.

Faro climate

Faro is warm and mild all year round. Rainy days are rare, but more likely from October to February. You can expect high temperatures of 28ºC during July and lows of 8ºC in January. Generally you should expect temperatures around the mid-twenties.

When to go to Faro

With more than 300 sunny days a year, Faro is truly a year-round destination. As Faro is a major city it isn't affected by the low season in the same way as the resorts. You would be pretty unlucky to experience one of the 65 rainy days, but to minimise your chances avoid visiting during November and December (the wettest months). The crowds descend from May to September, when the weather is at its warmest. You're more likely to find cheap flights and hotels in Faro from October to March.

Flying to Faro

Flights to Faro are available from major UK airports and take about three hours.

 Faro Deals

Hotels in Faro

Car hire in Faro

Images by flickr/BertKaufmann