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Cheap flights to Myanmar

Myanmar (Burma) is Asia’s forbidden fruit. After years of isolation, and a tourism boycott by the west, the country is just starting to get to grips with its new status as a desirable place to visit.

When you step into Myanmar, you might feel like you’re stepping back in time. People still travel around by horse and cart, holy men are treated like celebrities, and mobile phone reception is all but non-existent. If you’re planning a trip to Myanmar it’s best to go now, while it’s still an unspoiled paradise of temples and floating gardens.

There are currently three international airports in Myanmar, with a fourth (Hanthawaddy International Airport) still under construction. If you’re planning a trip, look for flights to the following destinations.

Mandalay International Airport (MDL)

This is the largest airport in the country, and boasts the longest runway in Southeast Asia. Mandalay itself is a typical south-east-Asian city. There’s plenty of hustle and bustle, with bikes and taxis jostling for space, and beautiful pagodas sit side by side with concrete office blocks. It’s a huge commercial centre, where most of the trade with India and China take place. There’s plenty of art, culture, and entertainment to be found in this vibrant city.

Yangon International Airport (RGN)

It might be smaller than Mandalay and Naypyidaw airports, but the airport in Yangon is the primary hub for international flights into Myanmar. The airport has already gone through a huge modernisation effort, and with a new contract for upgrade recently being signed, it looks like there will be plenty more improvement to come. Previously known as Rangoon, the city is home to some dazzling sights including the Shwedagon Paya Buddhist Temple.

Naypyidaw International Airport (NYT)

Naypyidaw is the purpose built capital city of Myanmar, constructed in secret during the early 2000s. As a result it’s pretty sterile compared to other cities in the country. The infrastructure can cope with far more people than actually live there, and as a result the wide boulevards are mostly empty and the streets are organised and uncluttered. It’s a breath of fresh air compared to other south-east Asian cities, but if you’re looking for a real cultural experience you’re unlikely to find it here.  

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